Saturday, 6 December 2014

Hougoumont: Reille's Assault - Part One

 Much has been learned during these practice games here in the biscuit mines of Ayrshire (deep in the Australian outback, just up the road from the Avon Napoleonic Fellowship - super site, check it out). 1) Never drop your dice on the sand, see it's a 'six' and claim it as legit. 2) Chateau to be broken into smaller sectors for defence. 3) Ridge angle to be steeper to allow manouvre room behind reverse slope. 4) Make smaller 'bite size posts. Here's how it played out...

Foy's Division nearly missed the turn off to the chateau due to faulty sat nav.
'Sar'nt Major! Stop the men singing the roof is rising'.
 Stand to in chateau...
 Foreground, Jerome, middle ground, Foy and distance Bachelu of Reille's Corps.
 Allied Cavalry on reverse slope...
 Troops to loop holes...
 Brunswick on crest interspersed by foot artillery.

 Allied skirmishers begin to engage enemy from wood...
'Last one in the chateau buy's the wine!'
 Foy surges forward...
'Is it too late to join the Women's Auxiliary Balloon Corps?'
 Jerome approaches farm walls...
 Foy forms columns and batters straight into the wood...
'Look! I've found truffles!'
 Allied skirmishers put up steady fire but are pushed by by superior numbers...
 ...any minute now the enemy will burst out of the wood...
 Seeing the Grand Battery firing (last game) as the afternoon wears on, the Allies pull away from crest and some lay down...
 View from crest to chateau....
 ...reverse slope units just hear the battle...
'Oh, go on. Let me just have one shot!'

 Jerome batters at the walls...
 The units inside (had to be formed units rather than elites because of the rules mechanism of
Shako 2) are lapped around by Jerome and Foy's Divisions seeking to make a breach somewhere.
 French Voltiguers Battalion throws itself at the garden wall.
 The fighting is tough....
...any moment some thing might give....

Next: Bachelu's Division, the cavalry and the sat nav - where to next?

14 comments:

  1. Another wonderful post, thanks. Plenty of pictures so that we don't have to translate too much text into 'strine. You have to keep some of your powder dry for Waterloo 200 though! :)
    p.s. Thanks for the plug, most kind.

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    1. Thanks a lot, James. Hoping for a perfect game that day for all the practice.

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  2. Very inspiring! Loving the post. Your blog is the single reason I have not yet parted with all my plastic Napoleonic troops.

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    1. Precisely the same here ! I've got thousands of 'em and every time I start to think about chucking them all I have to do is look here...

      Cheers, Dave

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    2. Dave, that's how I got started on Napoleonic's...a chap didn't want to chuck them so, he gave them to me as a starter kit.

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  3. Lovely stuff, cracking buildings to.

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    1. Thanks, Paul...it is truly amazing what buildings you can get in card these days.

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  4. Hi
    The home of shine here. The playtesting seems to be going well. Beware, is that French blue or Prussian black coming? Jan 24 will be both. Flight booked. Did the book go down well?

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  5. Looking forward to your dazzling presence. Never-mind, Ney, they're on the moon! Book in custody of Colin, now classed as 'precious things'. I am promised a shot.

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