Friday, 15 February 2013

Basic Napoleonic Painting 2 - The agony and the extasy

 So, once primed with your own brand of primer to make sure the paint sticks to the plastic I usually undercoat in black (it covers a multitude of sins) and then just pick out the colours you wish...

Light company...
Grenadier company...
 
... and back light company...for mood.
'ow!'
 Casualty figures are the easiest job you'll ever take on because you can muck it up. Just cut up the figure...
'Ahh, much better.'
 ...and glue it back together again. KIDDING!...just got the pics the wrong way round.
 Once cut up, arrange on a base of putty (this is Milliput) and take your hot soldering iron...
 and gently heat bits that stick up so that they conform to the base. You can also weld bits together if you think the effect too brutal.
 The best cas. figs. are the supplied ones but you don't want them too similar.
 Cut and melt until you're happy (sated?) then paint in the usual way.
 Remember; never do one when you can do a dozen, and never do a dozen why you can do twenty, etc.
 It's quick because you only do one side of the figure.
 A generic is fine for each nation but you can do as you wish. Every unit can have its shadow if you've the time.
 It's a counter so not too much fuss needed...these are hardly for display.
 And..viola! some sand...
 ...some flock...
 ...and you're done...
...or rather, they are.

The French battalions are in 36's four bases of six, two light bases of three each and the same for the grenadier company. This means you can have two ranks deep or three, or you can hive off the lights and grenadiers into elite battalions (one light and one grenadier for every four 36 man battalions)

Next...more daring do.



2 comments:

  1. The Airfix French artillerymen look great! The casualty figures are fantastic. Gives me some motivation to try something like that. I have only cut the head off of a couple of figures.

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  2. I suppose it's the beauty of plastics. A botched job has only cost about 12p instead of a quid and you very often have spares anyway. Thanks for the input.

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