Wednesday, 9 November 2011

Terrain again

Mould and pat down the damp, but not wet, sand. The wetter the sand the longer it takes to dry.
 This can be fun or laborious according to your child-like beach tendencies. Of course you can just go out into the street and drag in a couple of folk to do it for you.
 Once it's all tamped down you need to start delineating features. Flock, sometimes called scatter is tailor made for the job. It can be expensive or you can make your own very cheaply,but in any case, you don't need a lot as it colours this section of the table (around 18' x 6') in about 2-3 standard bags worth.
 Mix you different colours of flock to get the shades you want.
 I recommend dark for valley floors and get progressively lighter in shade the higher the features become.
 Virtually the same pic as last time but with the colour added it enhances the topography
 Roads are often formally built or laid on the sand but tracks are easily picked out with light grey scatter. As you can see from this angle, picking out valley floor, slopes and high points is no problem.
 Add a few copses and woods...best delineated by a heavier flock before putting down your trees in case you have to move them during the action to get the figures into the woods.
 Denote absolute high spots with a bright or very distinctive colour
 ...and now it looks like your cavalry (courtesy of Billy C) is going somewhere

...in a hurry
 Particularly at eye level sand terrain gives the impression that you can't see everything that is going on. The soldiers eye view is very different to that of the commander.
 I use a periscope during our games quite often. Its utility is obvious but you can never be 100% sure about dead ground and hull down positions.

...and you just can't tell whether you're under the eye of the C.O. or not.

(With thanks to Billy C. and Colin L. for creative assistance)

Next, you fight your battle, well, d'uh! and if any one's interested in sand tables, mobile sand tables, making flock or has questions about the uses and limitations of sand tables then let me know and I'll try to help with some answers.

20th of November 'Clash of Plastic' report will follow.

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